Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Slightly Anemic

But for the cut of this dress, I don't think it would have made the cut here. Sometimes failure in painting is a kind of badge of courage, sometimes it is just clumsy. Failure as an operating principle is not my end goal. I am not pushing to failure in mechanical execution but instead to a kind of elegant clumsiness. The hand-made has the ability to be much more evocative in its execution. That said, I think this drawing is just darn clunky. But as I am posting a drawing a day, I figure this is my a makeup drawing, and I am forgiven, I hope.

Beauty School Drop Out

It is hard to tell what is more saccharine, her dress or the paper. And yet, the dress fits like a potato sack. I like these drawings as they get more plain. I didn't remember how much I liked flat color. The way slight tonal variations lay next to one another is infinitely pleasing. Muted, whited out pinks sit well next to one another.

Casting About

Yet another girl to add to the collection.

So I was drawing this little lady today, trying to think why I'm doing such frivolous work. I'm making a catalogue of 40s Sears Roebuck catalog girls and zoo and farm animals. I am working in my studio on woodland scenes (CT woods!) with food deposits and silent offerings. What the hell am I doing?

Well, not pouring paint. Not caving in to the romantic urge to replace religion with art making and viewing. The musuem as temple or mausoleum, no more! The pour or splatter is not longer an apparation in my world. The pour, the splatter, the shaped color, no longer a stand in for the bodily and the ether, the toxic explosion and the apparition, a cipher for bodily movement and its excretions, a rote for faux inspiration and a mere excuse to take on "I am nature." And yet, so appealing is the urge to talk to that kind of romaticism. Maybe I should be caving in. I think I might. I don't want to be coy or someone-forbid snarky! And supposedly irony is dead, so what have I left but absurdist romanticism and action.

Well, I have archive-building. But now I have a way to deal with these archive images. Central casting. I hope to cast drawings and paintings from these archive drawings. So we shall see. There may be humor and irony in the juxtaposition of different cast elements, but all shall be painted with straightforwardness in the archive. This makes me feel more honest.

Saturday, July 15, 2006

Miss Lollipop

This drawing reminds me of one of John Weiners' summertime poems fantasizing about Miss Lollipop. She was so wicked and alluring in a sweet and sweaty way. I believe the poems are actually in a journal from 1959 that Weiners published late in his life under the title 707 Scott Street.

The flower paper is supposed to be presented in a lozenge form (diamond) but I cannot figure out how to scan it that way. The diamond shape doesn't quite fit on the flatbed and I have yet to buy my fancypants Adobe Photoshop program for the Mac which would help me flip it to full lozenge power. Sigh, too much complaining and not enough loafing.
I like the slowness and familiarity of summer at home on a lawn chair.

Friday, July 14, 2006

Quick Footed in the Morning

Not much to say here. I think I'm just collecting cliches as characters. I dig the limited palette and the pink craft paper. I'm not so quick witted in the morning.

Thursday, July 13, 2006

In Sweet Fragrant Meadows of Dawn and Dew

One more for today. A second sweater girl, with a nod to 40s Sears Roebuck catalog fashion (oddly related to German fashions as well). I guess I'm collecting the greatest generation and making them into a flip book. I have this tendency to create an archive of images to use for later. Maybe this is what this blog will be for. I got kinda stuck right after I started, I think I was afraid of the permanency of the web. Of putting out these drips and drabs of myself over and above a kind of packaged ideal. But maybe these little driblets and throw away ideas are much more interesting than the work itself, the total package. I dunno, but I'm still going slightly incognito. I'm still slightly embarassed by my work and my dumb photos.

Sweater Girl Wears a Trench

This is my favorite. I suppose I enjoy the sweater as wallcovering almost as much as the ruby slippered dame waiting for a passing single engine plane. I like that because her gaze is so animated, she could be watching a spy sidle up to her or she could be waiting for a bus. Waiting is a Hitchcock thing, as is the single figure in the expanse. Maybe decadent interiors are too, although I think I would rather align my sensitivities there with Neo-Baroque.

Wool Skirt

There is something kind of gracious about this pose. As if she is patting something or somebody on the head. Again, the dress is a riff on 1940s era clothing, with some of my own additions. Many of the templates for these girls may be found in Sears Roebuck catalogues. I appretiate the girls stocky legs and rounded faces. The way I'm handling paint around the faces and in the skirts is a little bit clunky, sometimes multiple layers of Gouache, an opaque Watercolor-type paint (a little explanation for the uninitiated). I like it when such a refined medium gets awkward. I have no interest in accuracy, more deviation from cleanliness for emotional affect. If something optimistic and forward-looking is handled with clunkiness, a touch almost bordering on premature wear and tear or faux nostalgia, then I feel as if I may in fact push against the crispness of the scrapbooking paper support underneath. My husband despises nostalgia in many forms, I'm not sure what I think about it. These drawings are escapist at their very core, but I don't think I can embrace the notion of nostalgia as a moral good either. Something about wishing for my grandmother's problems and fashion sense gives me the willies.

New Drawings

I just started a series of drawings. You shall see more of these in the next couple of days. I'm using the trappings of 1940s era clothing to signify optimism and solidity. Why is it that wartime women always look heavier? More literaly present? Willing to take up space and wear more practical dresses? I have paired these women with one of my old favorites, a support of craft paper or scrapbooking paper. I am tempted to resort again to the language of stickers and gel pens, but I'm trying to hold myself back. I like that the color palette for the models stands in front of the bright pop of the ground. It is almost as if their more conservative palette and styling could stand in front of plaid or paisley in astrobrights. Well, enjoy. This is my return to the blog. My return to steady work. I got bogged down in preparing egg tempera surfaces and pigments, which I have yet to use... sigh.